Download eBook From Here, You Can't See Paris: Seasons of a French Village and Its RestaurantAuthor Michael S. Sanders – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

I was wandering by a display in my local library and picked out this book I have only been to France once to Paris for 4 days I admit I have romantic imaginings about the French countryside dancing in my head So, I thought I d indulge those fantasies by reading this book It is non fiction and written by an author from the US who moves to a very small, rural village in the French countryside with his family for a year He decides to profile the one restaurant in the village which is pretty I was wandering by a display in my local library and picked out this book I have only been to France once to Paris for 4 days I admit I have romantic imaginings about the French countryside dancing in my head So, I thought I d indulge those fantasies by reading this book It is non fiction and written by an author from the US who moves to a very small, rural village in the French countryside with his family for a year He decides to profile the one restaurant in the village which is pretty well known and is often booked solid during the tourist season The main subject in this book is food French style And in France, it seems, food is life, so he intertwines many stories of the people in the village who all seem to be involved in producing, cooking or serving food in one way or another You can learn all about how foie gras is made yuck , how to cultivate truffles, and the kinds of dishes that are served in a small French restaurant As with most stories about rural lives I was reminded that it is not an easy life, but there is a richness there that is much different than the lives of we city folks This book tells the story of an American writer who moves to a tiny village in southwest France with his family to write about the changing nature of the French countryside He spends most of his time in La Recreation, the one restaurant in Les Arles, profiling the owners and their cuisine Sanders makes excellent observations about French culture, people and food The book is very atmospheric and highly enjoyable If you like this book, check out From Paris to the Moon by Adam Gopnik. I read every book whose them is observations of an American transplanted in France And most are pretty predictable American discovers just how ultimately satisfying it can be to learn to enjoy life like the French This is much the same, but done very well Author, wife, and young child spend a year in tiny Les Arques, a small farming community with a popular seasonal restaurant The author is engaging and enlightening, and he adds a lot to the discourse of Americans discovering the French I read every book whose them is observations of an American transplanted in France And most are pretty predictable American discovers just how ultimately satisfying it can be to learn to enjoy life like the French This is much the same, but done very well Author, wife, and young child spend a year in tiny Les Arques, a small farming community with a popular seasonal restaurant The author is engaging and enlightening, and he adds a lot to the discourse of Americans discovering the French Si vous aimez la France, ce bouquin vaut la peine Great book about a family s year in a very small town in southwest France and the town s restaurant It takes you on a tour of the markets and farms where French food is grown and raised vegetarians beware the chapter on foie gras , and really gives a sense of what a traditional small Fench village is like Very enjoyable. From Here,You Can t See Paris is a sweet, leisurely exploration of the life of Les Arques population, a hilltop village in a remote corner of France, untouched by the modern era It is a story of a dying village s struggle to survive, of a dead artist whose legacy began its rebirth, and of chef Jacques Ratier and his wife, No lle, whose bustling restaurant the village s sole business has helped ensure its future The author set out to explore the inner workings of a French restaurant kitchen but ended up stumbling onto a wider, much richer world Whether uncovering the darker secrets of making foie gras, hearing a chef confess his doubts about the Michelin star system, or absorbing the lore of the land around a farmhouse kitchen table after a boar hunt, Michael Sanders learned that life in Les Arques was anything but sleepy Through the eyes of the author and his family, the reader enters this world, discovers its still vibrant traditions of food, cooking, and rural living, and comes to know the village s history, sharing along the way an American family s adventures as they find their way in a place that is sometimes lonely, often wondrous, and always fascinating Sooo, I enjoyed this, mostly because Michael Sanders writes about food I have to admit though that I think he is a bit wordy There were plenty of times throughout the course of this book where I felt he could have written the exact same thing in half the space Still enjoyable, except for the descriptions of foie gras, which, really, I don t need to know about, nor do I need to ever try it. Pretty boring, especially compared to all the really great similar stuff out there. Half way through as of today A gift from Nancy last year A good tale of a village with the details that inform Even if so much is familiar and recognizable to one who lives partly in French villages, there are other sections that are newly informative, especially about the agricultural past in the Lot and of course the story of a successful restaurant Perhaps a good parallel would be the book about a library and its cat in the midwest that someone else gave me Susan.This remained interesti Half way through as of today A gift from Nancy last year A good tale of a village with the details that inform Even if so much is familiar and recognizable to one who lives partly in French villages, there are other sections that are newly informative, especially about the agricultural past in the Lot and of course the story of a successful restaurant Perhaps a good parallel would be the book about a library and its cat in the midwest that someone else gave me Susan.This remained interesting and informative, even for bits I sort of am familiar with, and at the end are some very good references to the area and practical, cultural advice on how to have a good meal in a French restaurant, especially outside of tourist areas, but even there I ended up liking the villagersthan I might have from adistanced viewpoint, I can t say, and of course liked the author himself and his project My main problems were with the repetitions of full bits of information almost like what happens when beginning a sequel, which its chapters are not They are not even meant to be read alone, which might explain it And the typos or misspellings, whichever they were, maybe 1 per chapter, or at least those that I noticed, even some French sorts of misspellings a doubled consonant or an E before the ment that ends both the English and French words for the same thing This is a very well written homage to French village life Sanders initially arrives to write about La Recreation , the new restaurant that has helped breathe life into the new village Inevitably, Sanders portrait becomes one of the whole village While the characters are interesting in their own right, what is fascinating is the light they shine on Les Arque specifically, and rural Francegenerally While this is a delightful tribute to la belle France rural, it is not idealised We lea This is a very well written homage to French village life Sanders initially arrives to write about La Recreation , the new restaurant that has helped breathe life into the new village Inevitably, Sanders portrait becomes one of the whole village While the characters are interesting in their own right, what is fascinating is the light they shine on Les Arque specifically, and rural Francegenerally While this is a delightful tribute to la belle France rural, it is not idealised We learn of the trouble the French truffle industry is in Running a restaurant in a rural setting is still very hard graft Perhapsso because hard decisions need to be made about how long and how often to open, good staff are harder to replace The issues facing rural France are of a declining and ageing population, which means that there are fewer people to support traditional industries and methods This reality fuels the impetus to industrial scale operations But Les Arques prospers for now Whilst the book is somewhat out of date they still use francs, for example it is still a book that Francophiles should read The tips at the end of the book on how to eat out in France still apply Michael S Sander s memoir of his year spent in a tiny French village was absolutely charming Though Sanders started out to write about life in a French restaurant, the book is actually about the villagers themselves.Centered around the city s main business, a restaurant in an old schoolhouse Le Recreation, or recess , the book takes us through a year in the life of Les Arques The elderly mayor, the family who makes its living keeping ducks for foie gras, the restaurateurs and their staff Michael S Sander s memoir of his year spent in a tiny French village was absolutely charming Though Sanders started out to write about life in a French restaurant, the book is actually about the villagers themselves.Centered around the city s main business, a restaurant in an old schoolhouse Le Recreation, or recess , the book takes us through a year in the life of Les Arques The elderly mayor, the family who makes its living keeping ducks for foie gras, the restaurateurs and their staff this is really a book about peoplethan it is about food Where the food comes into play is in the way that it brings the entire village together.Sanders prose puts the reader right in the middle of everything, whether its the village fete or the orchards where truffles might be found I learnedabout foie gras and trufficulture than I imagined possible, just to name two things Mostly, I came to admire the folk of Les Arques just as Sanders and his family did.Highly recommended for Francophiles and foodies alike