read online pdf Elves, Wights, and Trolls: Studies Towards the Practice of Germanic Heathenry: Vol. IAuthor Kveldúlf Hagan Gundarsson – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

Elves, Trolls, and Wights is the most complete study yet made of the various beings with whom the Vikings shared their world, from the smallest spirits of stones and plants to the great giants who strive against or aid the Norse gods Elves, dwarves, giants, wights dwelling in rocks, streams, and oceans these beings have been friends, foes, and even lovers of humans, and often worked closely with farming and fishing folk on a daily basis than did the gods themselves In this book, Kveldulf Gundarsson, long famed scholar of Old Norse religion and Heathen leader, looks closely at the history and folklore of these beings and offers a practical guide for dealing with them Elves, Trolls, and Wights also includes Kveldulf s new translation of the little known Icelandic skaldic poem Berg Dweller s Song, in which the giant Hallmundr tells of his own folk and world faring


10 thoughts on “Elves, Wights, and Trolls: Studies Towards the Practice of Germanic Heathenry: Vol. I

  1. Steve Cran Steve Cran says:

    This book is an excellent little book for those who wish to understand the land and water spirits in Heathen Norse mythology and of course those who would wish to get into the practice of Asatru The book is scholarly and the author makes plenty of reference to source material all of which is cited in the back for further reference The author himself has a PHD in in Old Norse from the Cambridge University.What follows is an awesome book that makes things rather clear First off to mention wight This book is an excellent little book for those who wish to understand the land and water spirits in Heathen Norse mythology and of course those who would wish to get into the practice of Asatru The book is scholarly and the author makes plenty of reference to source material all of which is cited in the back for further reference The author himself has a PHD in in Old Norse from the Cambridge University.What follows is an awesome book that makes things rather clear First off to mention wights are spiritual being that are connected to the land Going through Norse material it seems the lines are rather blurry when it comes to distinguishing between the various types of wights, whether they be alfs, dwarves, etins or giants It seems that the main dividing line could be their relation with human beings as to whether they are harmful or helpful Another key point worthy of mention is the comparison and contrast to the Sidhe or Irish faery folk The Germanic or Norse spirits are rather by and large well disposed towards manknind where as the Sidhe or Irish faery folk can be somewhat hostile.Etins or giants are not only large spirits but are ones that are deemed somewhat harmful for mankind.In some of the lore they harm humans on accident and other times on purpose Jotuns and Trolls are also considered a species of giant Trolls are rather ambiguous It seems from some of the lore that Troll could be a form of magic or that trolls are revenants formerly dead Land spirits seems to be the most positively disposed towards humans They can give humans advise, healing knowledge of herbs and access to the world of the spirits Once can also eat of their food and of drink of their beverages It is no problem where as with the Irish Sidhe such an action would be deemed unwise Some of the troll food and drink is rather dangerous to humans as it is too strong for human consumption Some land spirits are Dwarves, light and dark alves, wood woses and etins Offering were left for the land spirits in return for abundant harvests and protection from evil One did not have to thank a land spirit and one had to accept any gift they gave or it would be an insult to them They are alsoeasily offended then the gods.Water spirits tended to beharmful to humans, whether on purpose or on accident Often times they would lure a human to the water and drown them Some of them would eat humans as well It would be worthy of mention that skelkies who were women in seal suits were known to marry men and bear offspring There were times that they would stay and other times they would leave back to their original environment either because of a broken vow or because the skelkie found their seal skin and was able to return Mermaids were female denizens of the sea who lured men in to drown them., They would sink ships as well Marbendils are wights of ill omen Water maids are well disposed towards humans and tend to foretell the future.Elves or Alves are divided into light alves and dark alves the distinction not being all too clear Sometimes dwarves are considered to be a dark alf Light Alves will help humans by giving knowledge of cures Dark Alves are a bitmenacing Information about the alves written after conversion to Christianity tends to be rather negative Alves are compared to demons and are often accused of taking possession of a human being similar to demonic possession Elf shot caused sickness like possession and maybe meningitis.Dwarves tend to live under the earth they are for dwarves strictly and tend to live in small groups or alone Not much mention is made of female dwarves but they are there Dwarves are known at times to abduct human women for marriage They hoard gold but are not attached to it No less to take their stuff brings on a curse Odin is connected to dwarves as is Loki Dwarves tend to be blacksmiths.A panoply of relations among the different wights is given thorough discussion Their relations with the gods is both hot and cold As etins will fight against the Gods yet at the same time will form alliances with them and even marry them Changeling are discussed and rituals are given in the back for those wishing to work with wights


  2. Kecia Kecia says:

    This is my second reading, and I gotfrom it this time around after a few years of study This is a better book if you are aware of the layers of meaning that Gundarsson suggests, but can t catalog, although he does provide sources At times, he doesn t dumb it down enough for those of us who don t read Old Norse, but it s a minor distraction.Whether I noticed it the first time or not, I can t remember, but I was impressed with Gundarsson s portrayal of Odin in association with the dwarves This is my second reading, and I gotfrom it this time around after a few years of study This is a better book if you are aware of the layers of meaning that Gundarsson suggests, but can t catalog, although he does provide sources At times, he doesn t dumb it down enough for those of us who don t read Old Norse, but it s a minor distraction.Whether I noticed it the first time or not, I can t remember, but I was impressed with Gundarsson s portrayal of Odin in association with the dwarves Here, too, I believe my familiarity with Northern literature was an asset, because I was able to mentally supply support and recognize the validity of associations he pointed out.Odin, death, dreams, madness, dwarf the deluder, etc It s there, though hard to express, and Gundarsson did a good job of suggesting the connections without hammering at the idea.Regarding trolls, giants and land wights, in general, I think he did a good job in depicting the nuances in the literature we have available An etin, for example, is not always a frost giant, but sometimes it s a goddess or a troll Context is important.He shorted the elves Alfs slightly, but so does the literature


  3. Miranda Miranda says:

    I have to say, I wasn t expecting much from this book because of the unprofessional looking cover and the religious focus But I went ahead and bought the book because of its good reviews, and I was extremely impressed I d been totally confused by the distinctions between different types of creatures in Scandinavian mythology, but after reading this book well, I m still totally confused But now I understand why The author takes me through the source material, explaining where he can, admit I have to say, I wasn t expecting much from this book because of the unprofessional looking cover and the religious focus But I went ahead and bought the book because of its good reviews, and I was extremely impressed I d been totally confused by the distinctions between different types of creatures in Scandinavian mythology, but after reading this book well, I m still totally confused But now I understand why The author takes me through the source material, explaining where he can, admitting ambiguities where he can t He presents multiple theories even when they re competing with one another After spending too long bouncing around sources that just referenced each other and stayed on the surface level, I m so glad I tried out this book It s really the source I didn t know I was looking for Thanks


  4. Vanessa Read Vanessa Read says:

    Essential for Icelanders and Scandinavians especially who are interested in our mythology and pre Christian religion of the Norse Good reference for all Germanic Heathens and belongs in a series with other volumes on this subject by the same author References to corresponding ideas from other pagan cultures make the subjects in this book mesh with all who follow nature paths of spirituality when humanity once looked upon the world as a web filled with fellow travellers.Also a nice little bibli Essential for Icelanders and Scandinavians especially who are interested in our mythology and pre Christian religion of the Norse Good reference for all Germanic Heathens and belongs in a series with other volumes on this subject by the same author References to corresponding ideas from other pagan cultures make the subjects in this book mesh with all who follow nature paths of spirituality when humanity once looked upon the world as a web filled with fellow travellers.Also a nice little bibliography of sources


  5. Amanda Amanda says:

    Extremely useful book


  6. Iris Iris says:

    This book took me a long time to finish.This is not because of the writing the author writes in clear language with many interesting and entertaining examples of the different land spirits.It took me long because I, like many others these days, grew up in a city, in a culture that dismisses the spiritual needs as weak, irrational, and sees in nature only a source to provide itself with, to take from.This book made me realise how poor I have been, growing up without knowing of these spirits and This book took me a long time to finish.This is not because of the writing the author writes in clear language with many interesting and entertaining examples of the different land spirits.It took me long because I, like many others these days, grew up in a city, in a culture that dismisses the spiritual needs as weak, irrational, and sees in nature only a source to provide itself with, to take from.This book made me realise how poor I have been, growing up without knowing of these spirits and how to connect to them Around me I see others who suffer from this same disconnect.I am still not very familiar with these beings in my area, but this book helped me in the process of becoming aware of them Seeing the land, the trees, the rivers as beings automatically helps me to treat them respectfully and politely, like I would any stranger, and that I consider the greatest reward of reading this book


  7. K.S. Thompson K.S. Thompson says:

    If you are looking for a twee romp through the land, a merry time with the Elves, tra la la and all that search elsewhere If you have a firm grip on the truth about the Other Crowd, then this book is probably going to be a welcome addition to your library It is academic, extremely well researched, and something I am certain to refer to time and time again I was especially appreciative of the chapter on Water Wights, which has only grown since my trip to Iceland.


  8. Lee Lynch Lee Lynch says:

    A mixture of great info, history, and some New Age type stuff Altogether I enjoyed it.