epub pdf Seven Viking Romances By Anonymous – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

Combining traditional myth, oral history and re worked European legend to depict an ancient realm of heroism and wonder, the seven tales collected here are among the most fantastical of all the Norse romances Powerfully inspired works of Icelandic imagination, they relate intriguing, often comical tales of famous kings, difficult gods and women of great beauty, goodness or cunning The tales plunder a wide range of earlier literature from Homer to the French romances as in the tale of the wandering hero Arrow Odd, which combines several older legends, or Egil and Asmund, where the story of Odysseus and the Cyclops is skilfully adapted into a traditional Norse legend These are among the most outrageous, delightful and exhilarating tales in all Icelandic literature


10 thoughts on “Seven Viking Romances

  1. Ateiluj Ateiluj says:

    This is one of the bests books I ve ever read I love viking stories, and this book gave me the opportunity to learnabout this fantastic culture, their ancient beliefs and the way they used to live I found really interesting that vikings were really brave and adventurous men They were always looking for action, adventures and new challenges to take I love the way they face problems, they always come with some creative and fantastic idea to solve them This book includes seven romances, This is one of the bests books I ve ever read I love viking stories, and this book gave me the opportunity to learnabout this fantastic culture, their ancient beliefs and the way they used to live I found really interesting that vikings were really brave and adventurous men They were always looking for action, adventures and new challenges to take I love the way they face problems, they always come with some creative and fantastic idea to solve them This book includes seven romances, and my favourite one was definitely Arrow Odd It is about the life of the breavest viking on Earth One day, a sorceress tells him his fortune, but he didn t want to listen to it, so he kicks her away from his house and goes far away from his country, and gets himself involved in the most fantastic adventures I would really recommend this book to anyone who likes stories full of adventures, love and fantasy Reading this tales is like going sailing in a dragon ship, full of brave men willing to kill monsters and get fantastic treasures A fantastic adventure Plenty of things seem full of danger to start with, but bring you luck in the end


  2. Stephen Simpson Stephen Simpson says:

    Historically important, particularly if you want to understand how the people of that era lived their lives That said they re not particularly exciting or interesting stories As is often the case with stories meant to be transmitted orally, there was a lot of repetition, a lot of stilted language, and a lot of plots that were and then this happened, and then this happened, and then this happened It is interesting to me, though, how in Norse viking stories the heroes are quite often Historically important, particularly if you want to understand how the people of that era lived their lives That said they re not particularly exciting or interesting stories As is often the case with stories meant to be transmitted orally, there was a lot of repetition, a lot of stilted language, and a lot of plots that were and then this happened, and then this happened, and then this happened It is interesting to me, though, how in Norse viking stories the heroes are quite often very unlikable at least by modern standards Not sure if that reflects on different standards of likeability back in that society or what, but it s interesting to me


  3. Sam Sam says:

    i find these viking tales rather charming they re casually bloody, and often funny and i like the attitude towards the supernatural in one of these stories, for example, a man is roused by his foster father in the middle of the night this is a man he s known for years and years, just an ordinary scruffy raider like anyone else but in the night the foster father leads his foster son to an island, and a stone table on the island in the dark, there are eleven people sitting around the table, i find these viking tales rather charming they re casually bloody, and often funny and i like the attitude towards the supernatural in one of these stories, for example, a man is roused by his foster father in the middle of the night this is a man he s known for years and years, just an ordinary scruffy raider like anyone else but in the night the foster father leads his foster son to an island, and a stone table on the island in the dark, there are eleven people sitting around the table, and the foster father takes the twelfth seat, at the head of the table the twelve begin to speak, and they call each other by the names of the old gods well met, thor, says the foster father well met, odin, says the voice of thor ordinary voices, in the dark and wind, become the voices of fate so easily, so naturally i find it comforting, i guess, or uncanny, or some strange combination of the two


  4. Nicki Markus Nicki Markus says:

    Seven Viking Romances was a fun read I enjoyed seeing how the storytellers put an Icelandic slant on some well known tales from elsewhere in the world A few bits had me laughing out loud If you already enjoying reading Icelandic medieval tales and sagas, you ll find something to enjoy in this book If you are new to them, this is possibly a good place to start as the tales are short and simple, lacking the complex familial relationships of the longer, heavier family sagas.


  5. Laure Laure says:

    Well this sure was a good read It felt very much like reading some ancient fairytales and I could but love how they were all connected and how intriguing it all was I have a few fave, of course, including the saga of Harald Eysteinsson and that of Herraud Each mention of another saga made my heart flutter This was inspirational.


  6. Jim Jim says:

    I was somewhat disappointed by these fairy stories Compared to the Sagas of Icelanders which themselves had fantastic elements, but embedded in aor less realistic story mostly about real people they have much less general interest I could understand that they served a purpose, most likely as entertainments for the family during the long, cold, and dark winter nights They feature kings, beautiful princesses, warrior princes, berserkers, witches, trolls, dwarves, and monsters The s I was somewhat disappointed by these fairy stories Compared to the Sagas of Icelanders which themselves had fantastic elements, but embedded in aor less realistic story mostly about real people they have much less general interest I could understand that they served a purpose, most likely as entertainments for the family during the long, cold, and dark winter nights They feature kings, beautiful princesses, warrior princes, berserkers, witches, trolls, dwarves, and monsters The stories take place in mythical or semi mythical locales such as Jotunheim, Geirrodstown, Giantland, Gnipalund, and Permia The farther away from Iceland the stories took place, thelikely they would be the settings for these tales These included theremote parts of Norway, Sweden, Russia, and Finland Probably the best of the tales is the first, Arrow Odd


  7. Ezra Ezra says:

    A couple girls gave me funny looks and asked about Romance in the title So I explained this is romance as in heroic sagas of mighty warriors committing supernatural deeds Okay, so I glossed over these same warriors impregnating every woman in their path Not muscular men seducing women.Until it was Somewhere around 200 pages in one of the heroes uses an obvious euphemism for what is between his legs to seduce a girl And then another euphemism on another girl I could not believe it Scan A couple girls gave me funny looks and asked about Romance in the title So I explained this is romance as in heroic sagas of mighty warriors committing supernatural deeds Okay, so I glossed over these same warriors impregnating every woman in their path Not muscular men seducing women.Until it was Somewhere around 200 pages in one of the heroes uses an obvious euphemism for what is between his legs to seduce a girl And then another euphemism on another girl I could not believe it Scandinavian romance novel in both senses.The stories were amusing and fast But then I like stuff about Odysseus, Beowulf, and Gilgamesh And the fictional Conan.P.S It seems like everyone is related to someone named Grim though Is that the John of Scandinavia


  8. Tracy Tracy says:

    Not only did the Vikings plunder a people s home and property, they also helped themselves to their tales and literature I found Ovid, Homer, and other classics cobbled together into these tales Unlike the Niebelingenleid, these stories displayed heroic, melodramatic acts accompanied by some pretty funny one liners For example, a couple of Vikings run into each other and start a pitched battle Suddenly, one of them realizes that neither of them has any loot and states, We might be the stupi Not only did the Vikings plunder a people s home and property, they also helped themselves to their tales and literature I found Ovid, Homer, and other classics cobbled together into these tales Unlike the Niebelingenleid, these stories displayed heroic, melodramatic acts accompanied by some pretty funny one liners For example, a couple of Vikings run into each other and start a pitched battle Suddenly, one of them realizes that neither of them has any loot and states, We might be the stupidest people in the world, fighting over nothing To hell with fame and glory these guys are about a buck And ya gotta love a guy who can compose couplets while being hacked to pieces


  9. Steve R Steve R says:

    Having just visited l Anse au Meadows, the site of a Viking settlement in northern Newfoundland, my interest in the medieval sagas of this hardy people was rekindled Upon reading these particular stories, I d have to say they are diverting, semi engaging and, unfortunately, all too predictable.They follow several distinctive tropes almost all major characters are either Kings or retainers of Kings, all the lead female characters are young, very beautiful and remarkable in all things that make Having just visited l Anse au Meadows, the site of a Viking settlement in northern Newfoundland, my interest in the medieval sagas of this hardy people was rekindled Upon reading these particular stories, I d have to say they are diverting, semi engaging and, unfortunately, all too predictable.They follow several distinctive tropes almost all major characters are either Kings or retainers of Kings, all the lead female characters are young, very beautiful and remarkable in all things that make one a woman their words, not mine Once a hero goes wandering off by himself, as frequently occurs, you can count on his becoming lost in some mist or storm, a prelude to his encountering fantastic, mystical, magical beings or some similar dire, fateful situation Sh0uld the hero have to avenge the wrongful, cowardly death of a father, brother or friend almost never a woman , you can rely on his five ships with twenty men each having to fight against thirty ships with fifty men each rough numbers, but you get the idea of exaggerated heroism due to exaggerated numbers Magical artifacts abound flying carpets, flint that when held makes one invisible and, the most common a sheepskin shirt the wearing of which makes one immune to tiredness when swimming or fighting as well as to any injuries sustained in the latter.All that being said, I found the extended saga on Arrow Odd called such due to his possession of magical arrows, some of which were made of stone quite superior to the others in this collection, probably because it was longer and there was just a hint of character development allowed for in the three hundred year lifespan of the title character Also, the story of Bosi and Herrauld was, while essentially repeating its structure two or three times, still great fun Bosi seduces maid after maid, never using the same euphemism for sex twice On the other hand, the story of King Gautrek never seemed to figure out who truly was its main character, while that of Helgi Thorisson was so slight as to prompt a thought that it was a fragment of a longer work.Generally, okay


  10. Jacob Lehman Jacob Lehman says:

    I d read Palsson s translations of Njalssaga, and this reminded me of it in some ways It s deeply insightful into the culture s values, e.g., female sexuality isopenly celebrated than one might have expected, but a stingy man tries to refuse a gift, since he doesn t feel he can repay it Odd tries to run from his fate and eventually fails, but there s an element of curse in the prophecy, that once it s been stated it WILL come true Also, magical shirts that protect the wearer from injury I d read Palsson s translations of Njalssaga, and this reminded me of it in some ways It s deeply insightful into the culture s values, e.g., female sexuality isopenly celebrated than one might have expected, but a stingy man tries to refuse a gift, since he doesn t feel he can repay it Odd tries to run from his fate and eventually fails, but there s an element of curse in the prophecy, that once it s been stated it WILL come true Also, magical shirts that protect the wearer from injury AND from getting tired while swimming are a popular gift The distinction between mail and such a device is obviously pronounced, which lends it its magical capabilities, but I don t recall swimming as such a focus in any of the Arthurian legends or other mythoi, suggesting that perhaps the ability to swim well, rapidly, and for long distances, was perceived as being acentral part of a warrior s skill set in the saga Viking age Possibly the result of aseafaring focused people, as likely an untimely death due to drowning as to battle