epub The Log from the Sea of Cortez – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

An alternate edition can be found hereInSteinbeck sailed in a sardine boat with his great friend the marine biologist, Ed Ricketts, to collect marine invertebrates from the beaches of the Gulf of California The expedition was described by the two men in Sea of Cortez, published inThe day to day story of the trip is told here in the Log, which combines science, philosophy and high spirited adventure Log from the Sea of Cortez includes the narrative of the journey and the essay About Ed Ricketts It does not include pictures and detailed descriptions of the species collected by Steinbeck and Ricketts See also Sea of Cortez


10 thoughts on “The Log from the Sea of Cortez

  1. Henry Avila Henry Avila says:

    On the Sea of Cortez, a muchexotic name also known as the Gulf of California seemingly the ideal place for an expedition in marine specimen gatherings, both John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts need to escape modern life the 1940 version, women trouble Mr Ricketts a renowned marine biologist without a degree is the expert, Mr Steinbeck the famous writer the money man, they hire a sardine boat at Monterey in the Golden State, the 77 foot Western Flyer, with a colorful crew of four, keep th On the Sea of Cortez, a muchexotic name also known as the Gulf of California seemingly the ideal place for an expedition in marine specimen gatherings, both John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts need to escape modern life the 1940 version, women trouble Mr Ricketts a renowned marine biologist without a degree is the expert, Mr Steinbeck the famous writer the money man, they hire a sardine boat at Monterey in the Golden State, the 77 foot Western Flyer, with a colorful crew of four, keep this between us, Steinbeck s wife Carol is the unmentioned seventh member, she will soon shed that title This narrative may be sometimes dull, too repetitive, written unofficially by Mr Rickets the professional when the focus is on obscure species found under rocks and dry beaches during ebb tides, weird creatures unknown to the general public, thousands of them brought back home, which is the reason the book was unsuccessful However the beauty of the gulf s largely uninhabited shores then , the sparkling blue waters and skies, the tantalizing islands viewed, some the crew landed on and explored, the fish happily jumping out of the warm sea , poor, quiet Indians in their small primitive canoes visiting the boat, the friendly Mexicans in the Sun drenched little cities welcoming the strangers, millions or billions of living organisms floating, swimming , flying or crawling on both coasts, the Baja California peninsula is 775 miles long, the men on the vessel enjoying each other s company for six weeks and their risque stories, they become comfortable together as the crew, Tony, Sparky, Tiny, Tex, along with John and Ed carefully navigate the lethal shores, full of hidden rocks, treacherous shoals, dangerous currents, high winds, storms that threaten the equilibrium and yes it s good to be obviously penned by the master John Steinbeck A mixed bag those lovers of the sea who I am one will like, but the casual reader or the people that demand a continuous plot from point A to Z not for them, very technical in spots, even boring yet the jewels will be uncovered and the the treasure discovered by the patient Footnote the great friends had planned another exciting voyage, this time to the remote, freezing Aleutian Islands of Alaska in 1948, a big contrast from the hot deserts of Baja, fate prevented this though by Mr Ricketts demise in a tragic traffic accident, and Steinbeck s tribute written as a introduction in this book is quite moving, the unstated sadness prevails through the pages of what might have been


  2. Joe Valdez Joe Valdez says:

    On March 11, 1940, John Steinbeck and his good friend, the marine biologist Ed Ricketts who served as Steinbeck s inspiration for the character of Doc in Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday cast off from Monterey Bay with a chartered crew of four aboard a 75 foot purse seiner christened the Western Flyer Their makeshift expedition made way for the Gulf of California Or, as the narration goes,Once it was called the Sea of Cortez, and that is a better sounding and aexciting name We stopp On March 11, 1940, John Steinbeck and his good friend, the marine biologist Ed Ricketts who served as Steinbeck s inspiration for the character of Doc in Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday cast off from Monterey Bay with a chartered crew of four aboard a 75 foot purse seiner christened the Western Flyer Their makeshift expedition made way for the Gulf of California Or, as the narration goes,Once it was called the Sea of Cortez, and that is a better sounding and aexciting name We stopped in many little harbors and near barren coasts to collect and preserve the marine invetrebraes of the littoral The expedition concluded on April 20, 1940 and the following year, Sea of Cortez A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research was published on the heels of Steinbeck s Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Grapes of Wrath The book consisted of Ricketts log, based on notes he took on the voyage and that Steinbeck edited, as well as an appendix that Ricketts compiled with photographs and drawings of specimens Ricketts would be killed in 1948 three days after a passenger train struck his car in Monterey To honor his friend s memory, Steinbeck republished the book as The Log from the Sea of Cortez in 1951, removing the appendix and adding a preface dedicated to his friend.If Ricketts or Steinbeck only published Sea of Cortez, they d have contributedto marine biology, geography and the humanities than most As recently as 1940, the Gulf of California had been documented with only varying degrees of accuracy the work of an 18th century Jesuit priest named Clavigero rates higher in Ricketts esteem than the Coast Pilot, the maritime guidebook he begrudges for its austere tone There was no sonar, no satellite imagery Photographic records were poor Communication along Lower California was primitive Ricketts and Steinbeck sailed one of the most dangerous bodies of water in the world for a month albeit the month of calmest seas with less technology than I m using to write this book review Though my mother might get a dizzy spell to see me admit this she s a retired science teacher , the scientific passages of the book were ones that my eyes tended to glaze over Crustaceans and other invetrebraes are simply not fascinating subject matter for me to read about They may be for you The marine biology portions of the book are far from dense or jargon filled and do have a pleasant knack for appealing to the ten year old explorer in all of us Many of the classifications simply started to pass by my eyes like something Willy Wonka would make up during a tour of the Chocolate Factory We found extremely large sponges, a yellow form probably Cliona , superficially resembling the Monterey Lissodendoryx noxiosa , and a white one, Steletta,of the wicked spines There were brilliant orange nudibranchs, giant terebellid worms, some shell less air breathing pulmonate snails, a ribbon worm, and a number of solitary corals These were common animals and the ones in which we were most interested, for while we took rarities when we came upon them in normal observation, our interest lay in the large groups and their associations the word association implying a biological assemblage, all the animals in a given habitat.Initially, the boats that Ricketts and Steinbeck attempt to charter in Monterey Bay are owned by Italian, Slav or Japanese sardine fishermen uneasy about anything not related to fishing The Western Flyer proves game Her captain, Tony Berry, is intelligent and tolerantHe was willing to let us do any crazy thing we wanted so long as we 1 paid a fair price, 2 told him where to go, 3 did not insist that he endanger the boat, 4 got back on time, and 5 didn t mix him up in our nonsenseThe rest of the crew consists of Tex Travis, the engineer, who demonstrates an aversion to sharing dish washing duties, and two able seamen, Sparky Enea and Tiny Colletto, whogrew up together in Monterey and they were bad little boys and very happy about it The highlights of Sea of Cortez for me were Ricketts picturesque accounts of his experiences in the Gulf, which transported me to that place and time I was reminded of Joseph Conrad s Heart of Darkness in the sense that the further the boat travels, the further back in time it seems to travel In ports of call like Cape San Lucas, the Western Flyer is welcomed with pomp by authorities as if the shrimper was the Queen Mary In La Paz, little boys swarm the deck once word gets out that gringos are throwing away money on worthless sea creatures In Puetro Escondido, a rancher invites the crew on a hunting trip with Indian guides in which no hunting takes place In Loreto, a little boy takes them on a tour This small boy could have been an ambassador to almost any country in the world His straight seeing dark eyes were courteous, yet firm He was kind and dignified He told us something of Loreto of its poverty, and how its church was tumbled down now and he walked with us to the destroyed mission The roof had fallen in and the main body of the church was a mass of rubble From the walls hung the shreds of old paintings But the bell tower was intact, and we wormed our way deviously up to look at the old bells and to strike them softly with the palms of our hands so that they glowed a little with tone.I can imagine that the only thing grander than Ricketts and Steinbeck exploring the Sea of Cortez for a month was editing Sea of Cortez Even though Steinbeck refused to take any credit whatsoever for the log, I was able to connect this book with the travelogue Steinbeck wrote twenty years later, Travels with Charley In Search of America While that book was about a successful author trying to rediscover the country he d been writing about from the comfort of his home in Long Island and autumnal in tone, Sea of Cortez is full of spring s youthful vigor, of living in the present, exploring the flora and fauna of Old Mexico with your best friend and other men.My list of John Steinbeck books ranked from favorite to least favorite 1 East of Eden 1952 2 The Grapes of Wrath 1939 3 Sweet Thursday 1954 4 Of Mice and Men 1937 5 The Wayward Bus 1947 6 Tortilla Flat 1935 7 The Winter of Our Discontent 1961 8 Cannery Row 1945 9 Sea of Cortez A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research 1941 10 Travels with Charley In Search of America 1962 11 The Pastures of Heaven 1932


  3. Sarah Sarah says:

    Do you ever catch yourself smiling like an idiot when you re reading something pleasurable Well, my smile muscles hurt The log begins with an introduction Steinbeck wrote, About Ed Ricketts, after his travel companion from the journey chronicled here died It s gorgeous What an fascinating man he was I had just read Cannery Row, and Ricketts inspired the character of Doc, so I was happy to learn about him, or at least what could be related to me in 50 pages or so Steinbeck mentions that Do you ever catch yourself smiling like an idiot when you re reading something pleasurable Well, my smile muscles hurt The log begins with an introduction Steinbeck wrote, About Ed Ricketts, after his travel companion from the journey chronicled here died It s gorgeous What an fascinating man he was I had just read Cannery Row, and Ricketts inspired the character of Doc, so I was happy to learn about him, or at least what could be related to me in 50 pages or so Steinbeck mentions that after his death, the people of Cannery Row tried to define him Of those he heard, half Christ and half goat was the description that he liked best There really needs to be a movie about Steinbeck and Ricketts Someone do that It would be so lushly beautiful, whether they re communing over many beers in Doc s laboratory in Monterey, or sailing into shallow wade pools along the Gulf of Mexico or having one of their four day long parties, where nobody went to bed except for romantic purposes I know that there is a movie version of Cannery Row, but it wouldn t have John Steinbeck in it And it wouldn t have this trip in it No, Steinbeck says in the introduction that Ricketts was his closest friend for eighteen years I want to watch them being friends An essential scene would be when they were allowed onto a large commercial Japanese shrimping dredge in Mexico that, to Steinbeck and Ricketts horror, simply scraped the ocean floor of absolutely every speck of life, then dumped everything that wasn t shrimp, now lifeless, back into the bay Ricketts and Steinbeck stared at vast collection of fish, sharks, anemones, rays, corals and seahorses being tossed back into the sea for the gulls All that knowledge, all that food, wasted An entire ecosystem wiped out And, in true form to the way Steinbeck honors even the most miserable lech in his fiction, he loved these men working on the Japanese shrimping dredge Loved them He said, they were good men, but they were caught in a large, destructive machine, good men doing a bad thing He promised to send them a fine volume of crustacean biology when he returned to Monterey The missing star is only absent because, after reading the introduction, I expected the same intimate, personal style to be woven into the log, throughout, and it wasn t really so It was still a narrative, and many of their adventures and conversations and struggles were described, but just not in the same casual manner I know this wasn t that sort of book, but god, it could have been Okay, I already feel guilty being just a titch fussy about this, because what this book is is just great I ll stop being a whiner I just wantedDoc In the intro I learned that Ricketts had such an affection for marine worms that he called girls he liked and there were many , wormy as a term of endearment So you can see why I wantedNow, you like Steinbeck, but are still unsure if you want to read this nonfiction account of tide pool specimen gathering Here is how you will know for sure that it is for you Do you love lists of captivating and beautiful and sexy as hell, sciency words Do you smile like an drooling moron when reading them I sure did Here is just one of the many lists describing some of their catches to help you decide One huge, magnificent murex snailso camouflaged with little plants, corallines, and other algae that it could not be told from the reef itselfrock oysters were there, and oysters limpets and sponges corals of two types peanut worms sea cucumbers, and many crabs, particularly some disguised in dresses of growing algaemany worms, including our enemy Eurythoe, which stings so badly The coral clusters were violently inhabited by snapping shrimps, red smooth crabs and little fuzzy black and white spider crabs And don t think that it s all lists and clinical talk He had a way of finishing off each chapter with a lucid and dreamy bit of philosophy or reflection This little trip of ours was becoming a thing and a dual thing, with collecting and eating and sleeping merging with the thinking speculating activity Quality of sunlight, blueness and smoothness of water, boat engines, and ourselves were all parts of a larger whole and we could begin to feel its nature but not its size Another chapter ends with his defense of drunkenness, another with a defense of laziness and another with a cry about the depletion of our natural resources and another with the beauty of scooping fish while you sail and dropping them directly into a pan of hot oil, eating hundred of the delicious and salty things with friends in the moonlight This book is just so pretty If you don t watch out, Steinbeck will make you love the world.Sarah Montambo Powell


  4. Ken-ichi Ken-ichi says:

    I m not sure I ve ever read another book that was so full of life, in every sense of the word Steinbeck and Ricketts portray an existence and a philosophy that seem impossibly engaged, impossibly full, and it isn t long before you re there on the boat beside them, a can of beer in one hand and a dip net in the other, peering into blue shallows in search of strange and beautiful creatures.It s bohemian two guys charter a boat to go tidepooling around the Gulf of California, mostly for the hell I m not sure I ve ever read another book that was so full of life, in every sense of the word Steinbeck and Ricketts portray an existence and a philosophy that seem impossibly engaged, impossibly full, and it isn t long before you re there on the boat beside them, a can of beer in one hand and a dip net in the other, peering into blue shallows in search of strange and beautiful creatures.It s bohemian two guys charter a boat to go tidepooling around the Gulf of California, mostly for the hell of it , but rigorous specimens are tediously labeled, filed, described Despite one of them being a professional in the strictest sense, both Ricketts and Steinbeck are the best kind of amateurs, seeking knowledge and adventure for the pure joy and love they find in them They re driven by a mission to describe the fauna of a relatively unexplored region, but that drive never consumes or defines them, or keeps them from swilling beer and philosophizing Their humor and presence in their journey brought as much pleasure to read and inhabit as any escapist fantasy I can imagine.The introduction breaks that fantasy a bit, describing how Steinbeck developed the book from journals that were not his own, and the complete omission of Steinbeck s wife Carol, who also sailed with them Then again, the intro and Steinbeck s euology to Ricketts provide a realistic backdrop that grounds and encapsulates the joy of the trip, making it seemattainable, andtrue You can never live aboard the Western Flyer, but you can always seek those kinds of moments


  5. BrokenTune BrokenTune says:

    Late, late in the night we recalled that Horace says fried shrimps and African snails will cure a hangover Neither was available.I called a stop to this 63% I skim read to the end to see if the log ever changes into something that has a structure or a point It may be that I am not in the right mood for this book, but from everything I have read, I get the impression that to be in the right frame of mind to read this book I would have to be on that boat, with a beer not the first of the d Late, late in the night we recalled that Horace says fried shrimps and African snails will cure a hangover Neither was available.I called a stop to this 63% I skim read to the end to see if the log ever changes into something that has a structure or a point It may be that I am not in the right mood for this book, but from everything I have read, I get the impression that to be in the right frame of mind to read this book I would have to be on that boat, with a beer not the first of the day , and develop a sudden liking for pointless meandering, unsubstantiated general philosophising, and killing things just to collect them And I just can t


  6. Sara Sara says:

    I loved this book and there isn t any review that I could write that could do it justice I enjoyed getting to know John Steinbeck and his friends I enjoyed his philosophical dissertations about life Although, I will admit, there was one chapter that I did doze through Yes, it is interesting that we spend so much money on health care and so much money on war to kill us Yes, I agree we spend so much on STUFF so that one neurotic generation raises another neurotic generation It is also inte I loved this book and there isn t any review that I could write that could do it justice I enjoyed getting to know John Steinbeck and his friends I enjoyed his philosophical dissertations about life Although, I will admit, there was one chapter that I did doze through Yes, it is interesting that we spend so much money on health care and so much money on war to kill us Yes, I agree we spend so much on STUFF so that one neurotic generation raises another neurotic generation It is also interesting that he wrote down these ideas around 1940 and so much of them seemed written in the present time.I know very little about marine biology so pictures of these sea creatures they collected would really have helped I love Steinbeck s straight laced sense of humor that just permeates this book I also am curious as to what the Sea of Cortez Gulf of California looks like nowadays It seemed beautiful in this book.I appreciate the afterword about Ed Ricketts, his marine biologist friend After reading Cannery Row and Sweet Thursday, you gotta love Ed Doc That was a good ending to this book


  7. John John says:

    I love Steinbeck Pure and simple He seems incapable of lapses in writing and has an uncanny ability to captivate his readers Okay, he taps into an innate geographical bias California born and bred, I relish visiting those locales around Monterey and the San Joaquin Valley that Steinbeck describes in his novels Plus he attended Stanford a decade or so after my grandparents and sixty years before moi , although he did not finish For years I have devoured whatever I could find from Steinbeck I love Steinbeck Pure and simple He seems incapable of lapses in writing and has an uncanny ability to captivate his readers Okay, he taps into an innate geographical bias California born and bred, I relish visiting those locales around Monterey and the San Joaquin Valley that Steinbeck describes in his novels Plus he attended Stanford a decade or so after my grandparents and sixty years before moi , although he did not finish For years I have devoured whatever I could find from Steinbeck whose position in the library is right next to another great writer of the West, Wallace Stegner, but not far enough away from another author who represents the lowest form of literary composition a woman named Steele But I held off reading this book for decades I suspected it might read like a boring textbook on marine life featuring Doc aka Ed Ricketts, puttering around lagoons and tide pools Au contraire It s another Steinbeck classic plenty of low life amusing characters straight our of Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row Some irreverent political commentary Lurid descriptions of natural beauty You get a sense of Steinbeck s immersion in a wonderful, simplisitc culture where the beer flows liberally and the days move leisurely Put the Sea of Cortez on that long list of places to see before you die


  8. M. Sarki M. Sarki says:

    I was especially taken with the last section found in the appendix that honored the life and death of Steinbeck s great friend Ed Ricketts What a wonderful tribute to a person who meant so much to so many in that part of the country The entire book was certainly an enjoyable and satisfying read It was good to hear this voice again.


  9. Jerome Peterson Jerome Peterson says:

    In 1940 John Steinbeck sailed in a sardine boat, Western Flyer, with his great friend the biologist Edward F Ricketts to collect marine invertebrates from the beaches of the Gulf of California This expedition was described by the two men in The Sea of Cortez, published in 1941 The day to day story of the trip is given in the Log, which combines science, philosophy, and high spirited adventure This edition includes Steinbeck s profile of his collaborator, About Ed Ricketts The best of Ste In 1940 John Steinbeck sailed in a sardine boat, Western Flyer, with his great friend the biologist Edward F Ricketts to collect marine invertebrates from the beaches of the Gulf of California This expedition was described by the two men in The Sea of Cortez, published in 1941 The day to day story of the trip is given in the Log, which combines science, philosophy, and high spirited adventure This edition includes Steinbeck s profile of his collaborator, About Ed Ricketts The best of Steinbeck is in this tale his superb narrative, descriptions, insights, poetic philosophy, and of course his humor His account of the vast variety of species was textbook but deeply interesting The characters he ventured with were a colorful lot showing tenacity, superstition, and the freewheeling carefree behavior of 1940 sailors Their individual names added a personal touch no doubt note, Sparky, Tiny, Tex, and Tony I enjoyed how Steinbeck added his bohemian philosophy much like a few other books have done For example Robert Pirsig s Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance Walden s Pond by Thoreau Kon Tiki by Thor Heyerdahl These books along with the Log seem to depict a bohemian style of wind in the face, sunshine on the shoulders, and the searching for deeper, yet, simple truth what bohemian want a bee s call the golden days in the June of life when the love of a modestly elusive Truth seemedglorious, incomparably, than the lust for the ways of the flesh and the dross of the world I especially enjoyed Steinbeck s philosophical take on laziness and his somber romanticizing on how the great world dropped away from them quickly its clamor, its danger, and its demands Remember it was a time when a good portion of the world was at war It engaged me After finishing the book and staring at it for a time, daydreaming, I suddenly got this tremendous urge to pack in my typewriter and bedroll, kiss the loved ones goodbye and head for the Gulf of California just to relive what the crew of the Western Flyer experienced and perhaps, induce a few experiences of my own If you like to take to the sea, road, or air, in an adventure book, I highly recommend this awesome read


  10. David David says:

    A well written book on a terribly boring subject Why Steinbeck thought this was a good use of his skills is beyond me The prologue About Ed Ricketts is at least somewhat amusing, though hardly compelling If Ed were a friend of mine, it would have been fascinating But Ed is was not a friend mine, nor are the lobsters and starfish which Steinbeck describes with inexplicable fascination The book contains some philosophy, which might be interesting and challenging for someone whose intell A well written book on a terribly boring subject Why Steinbeck thought this was a good use of his skills is beyond me The prologue About Ed Ricketts is at least somewhat amusing, though hardly compelling If Ed were a friend of mine, it would have been fascinating But Ed is was not a friend mine, nor are the lobsters and starfish which Steinbeck describes with inexplicable fascination The book contains some philosophy, which might be interesting and challenging for someone whose intellectual development fossilized at Herbert Hoover s Republicanism Today, it s just a verbose curio