[ read online ePUB ] God Bless You, Dr. KevorkianAuthor Kurt Vonnegut Jr. – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

From Slapstick s Turkey Farm to Slaughterhouse Five s eternity in a Tralfamadorean zoo cage with Montana Wildhack, the question of the afterlife never left Kurt Vonnegut s mind In God Bless You, Dr Kevorkian, Vonnegut skips back and forth between life and the Afterlife as if the difference between them were rather slight In thirty odd interviews, Vonnegut trips down the blue tunnel to the pearly gates in the guise of a roving reporter for public radio, conducting interviews with Salvatore Biagini, a retired construction worker who died of a heart attack while rescuing his schnauzer from a pit bull, with John Brown, still smolderingyears after his death by hanging, with William Shakespeare, who rubs Vonnegut the wrong way, and with socialist and labor leader Eugene Victor Debs, one of Vonnegut s personal heroesWhat began as a series of ninety second radio interludes for WNYC, New York City s public radio station, evolved into this provocative collection of musings about who and what we live for, and how much it all matters in the end From the original portrait by his friend Jules Feiffer that graces the cover, to a final entry from Kilgore Trout, God Bless You, Dr Kevorkian remains a joy This is one Vonnegut book that I could not connect with There wasn t really anything that linked up and each conversation seemed to not matter to the others There were parts that amused me but on the whole, it wasn t worth my time, even though it did not take much time to digest. God Bless you, Dr Kevorkian began as a series of radio spots narrated by Kurt Vonnegut and then compiled into this short but humorous collection The idea is that Vonnegut is a radio reporter to the Afterlife and he interviews several people in Heaven Kevorkian assists him in near death experiences Like all of Vonnegut s work, it is funny and thought provoking at the same time God Bless you, Dr Kevorkian began as a series of radio spots narrated by Kurt Vonnegut and then compiled into this short but humorous collection The idea is that Vonnegut is a radio reporter to the Afterlife and he interviews several people in Heaven Kevorkian assists him in near death experiences Like all of Vonnegut s work, it is funny and thought provoking at the same time This tongue in cheek journal of interviews, smirkingly presented by our narrator and fictional radio journalist, Mr Kurt Vonnegut himself, as Non Fiction, is a succinct promotion of Humanist sorry, Kurt, I mean little h humanist values, a playfully mocking critique of blind faith spirituality, and a short sprint down various tiny, random branches of both famous and near forgotten history It is also an homage to Jack Kevorkian and his all too humanistic life and work, as well as a critiqu This tongue in cheek journal of interviews, smirkingly presented by our narrator and fictional radio journalist, Mr Kurt Vonnegut himself, as Non Fiction, is a succinct promotion of Humanist sorry, Kurt, I mean little h humanist values, a playfully mocking critique of blind faith spirituality, and a short sprint down various tiny, random branches of both famous and near forgotten history It is also an homage to Jack Kevorkian and his all too humanistic life and work, as well as a critique of the way we as a predominantly Christian West have chosen to Kurt and I say wrongly , but think as you will deal with Jack and his assertion that individuals rather than, say, State or Federal Governments have the right to choose whether they live or die, and should not fear the wrath of a higher power or the eternal flames of infinite misery as a result, let alone punishment by various legal bodies on Earth Vonnegut s admiration for the man is coded within the text of every page, which is saying a lot considering that each piece is only about a page and a half long Each section is a parable of sorts, based on the life and accomplishments and or sins of various historical figures whom Vonnegut conducts interviews with at the gates of Heaven while under a temporary death state which the good Doctor himself has orchestrated From Isaac Newton and Billy Shakespeare to James Earl Ray and Adolf Hitler, everyone is waiting in Vonnegut s fictional afterlife in the only state of existence available, that of the seemingly overcrowded, fairly commonplace Great Home in the Clouds There is no Hell, and those in Heaven are still much as they were on Earth Ray, still a Ray cist whose afterlife is haunted with the notion that his bullet was the catalyst which immortalized MLK s words Hitler, still a fame whore desirous of a monument at the UN headquarters in NYC which simply states I Beg Your Pardon Shakespeare, an elusive, pompous dandy who answers all interview questions solely with direct quotes from his numerous plays before finally breaking off the interview with a dismissive Get thee to a nunnery One after another these people speak briefly with Vonnegut, from the first man to ever fly a hot air balloon over the Alps to the first woman executed for murder in Texas in the 20th Century Somber humor abounds throughout these miniscule pieces, a tone that is one of their saving graces and which inclines me to recommend this book if only for the fact that you can finish it within an hour or so.While this is certainly not the most important work Vonnegut committed to print in his lifetime, I still found myself satisfied in the end if only for the fact that I agree with him on his overarching points that the goal of life should not be avoiding punishment and pursuing reward based on scriptural anecdotes, but rather to be as good a person as you can be based on reasoned assessments of human nature and the world itself, to reject dogmatic notions of sin and and repentance out of fear of personal suffering in some scientifically unfounded notion of an afterlife, and that Dr Jack Kevorkian was a modern martyr for the cause of sorely lacking personal freedoms Hell yeah, Kurt Fist pound I love this excellent little book I ve been a fan of Kurt Vonnegut s since I first read Slaughterhouse Five many years ago This little book exceeded my expectations I hope Mr Vonnegut is still writing now, down at the other end of the blue tunnel. I m on the fence about a lot of Vonnegut s work Because on the one hand, I read Slaughterhouse 5 as a literature illiterate in Junior year of High School it wasn t until after High School that I became a real fan of reading So there s a lot to love about Vonnegut on a purely nostalgic basis, or at least on the basis that he is who introduced me to literature in the first place It was he that warmed me up to the great works that were to come, and of all the books that I claim to love now I I m on the fence about a lot of Vonnegut s work Because on the one hand, I read Slaughterhouse 5 as a literature illiterate in Junior year of High School it wasn t until after High School that I became a real fan of reading So there s a lot to love about Vonnegut on a purely nostalgic basis, or at least on the basis that he is who introduced me to literature in the first place It was he that warmed me up to the great works that were to come, and of all the books that I claim to love now I wonder to what extent I would appreciate the works that I do know if it wasn t for writers like Vonnegut to sharpen my literary tastes For that I am thankful for the guy and appreciate the impact he s had on me as a reader and fan of literature BUT on the other hand, I have to admit you to all, my dearest goodreaders, that I have grown out of Vonnegut s work significantly And as snobbish or condescending as that might sound, tis the truth of the matter It s difficult, for me anyway, to read other authors who push the envelope of writing and flex their might prowess with prose, to return to my roots and read the plain jane Vonnegut style and still enjoy it The lengths to which other authors have brought me seems to overshadow the work that Vonnegut does He is a writer of his own admission that is great in ideas but weak in actual writing ability While I don t agree that his writing is weak it is its own style and inhabits its own space as a style of writing , I do agree with the underlying sentiment V puts emphasis on the ideas and structure of the story muchthan he does of his writing And I m at the point in my career as a reader that I will always want something from the writing itself, as a mode and avenue of expression For me, the whole point of reading literature what separates itself from any other medium of story telling are the things that writing can do in and of itself, hence my proclivity for post modernism that puts writing itself as the main focus of its story telling aim and prose that is effected poetically in some way, shape or form, Nabokov, Woolf, etc This is the main issue that I take with all minimalist writing, which maximalist writing loose categories here, nothing too specific in mind provides and quenches what I seek to get from writing If the writing is so transparent so as to allow a fully clear view into the story itself, then what s the point of using words Why not any other medium Such writing yields the medium of writing arbitrary Not all of this applies to Vonnegut however, because he has quite a few tricks up his sleevethan the other minimalist writers that use such style of stripped down prose It s interesting that Vonnegut is pomo in several ways author inserted into the story, incredulity towards grand narratives and self awareness of the medium itself yet he presents it all in such a simple way I think that if I wereinclined towards the stripped down Hemingway style, that Vonnegut would be one of my favorite writers of all time, but alas, I m not and alas he s not.This story in particular is a great read short, fun and intelligent The ending sets up this ambiguity that resides at the heart of all of Vonnegut s novels Without spoiling anything, there is a tension running throughout the whole novella between the secular and the religious, and in tandem, meaningless existence and meaningful existence Despite being a proclaimed atheist and humanist, Vonnegut the author and the narrative persona writes a story about heaven and everyone inside it The reason why this idea and conceit is so much fun in the book is that most of us find comfort in such things no controversy here, right assurance of a special place after you die is muchcomforting than the unknown void after one dies So Vonnegut plays with this propensity we have as human beings to keep us going through this playful story, wherein the main character travels back and forth between earth and the gates of heaven to speak to famous figures of history Yet at the end, the credibility of the narrator is thrown into doubt as well as the credibility of all such stories that give us hope The question remains if Vonnegut is an optimist or a pessimist about the hope that people get from such fanciful stories And that s where his genius shines because for a few sweet minutes after finishing the story, he is both at the same time hopeful and hopeless About twenty 2 to 3 page vignettes in which a fictional version of Vonnegut himself interviews all manner of deceased people, from the famous to the not so famous, in the tunneled entrance to what amounts to a Christian version of Heaven There are gems of Vonnegutian is that a word wisdom throughout, and lots of bits of high brow humor sometimes too high brow, for my tastes , but there lacks any sort of overarching narrative or message to the book, an omission that would ve catapulted this About twenty 2 to 3 page vignettes in which a fictional version of Vonnegut himself interviews all manner of deceased people, from the famous to the not so famous, in the tunneled entrance to what amounts to a Christian version of Heaven There are gems of Vonnegutian is that a word wisdom throughout, and lots of bits of high brow humor sometimes too high brow, for my tastes , but there lacks any sort of overarching narrative or message to the book, an omission that would ve catapulted this easy reading novella from good to great Still, this is Kurt Vonnegut we re talking here, and I say these words in comparing him only to himself Any lesser writer would have floundered with this material Vonnegut nails the subject matter here with the dark levity it deserves, in the way that only he can 2.5 Would we take that 3 4 s dead and go through the blue tunnel with a round trip back to life journey if we could To obtain information from the mind of some of the best known intellectuals to ever live, with the absence of the concept of time Vonnegut posits this for a brief analysis through the mind of a reporter that is being assisted by the ever so loved Dr Jack Kevorkian.Witticisms a plenty and sarcasm, as usual, Vonnegut plays the intermediary interlocutor between the long dead som 2.5 Would we take that 3 4 s dead and go through the blue tunnel with a round trip back to life journey if we could To obtain information from the mind of some of the best known intellectuals to ever live, with the absence of the concept of time Vonnegut posits this for a brief analysis through the mind of a reporter that is being assisted by the ever so loved Dr Jack Kevorkian.Witticisms a plenty and sarcasm, as usual, Vonnegut plays the intermediary interlocutor between the long dead some famous, some banal and the living.A bit anti war at times, yet always himself, Vonnegut doesn t touch any new territory with this short work than he already has, but entertains and makes us crack a smile at random thoughtsI asked this heroic pet lover how it felt to have died for a schnauzer named Teddy He was philosophical He said it sure as heck beat dying for absolutely nothing in the Viet Nam War If you re a novice when it comes to Vonnegut s work, bypass this for Slaughterhouse Five or even Bluebeard You ll find better stuff from him elsewhere, so it goes God Bless You, Dr Kevorkian, Kurt VonnegutGod Bless You, Dr Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short fictional interviews written by Vonnegut The title parodies that of Vonnegut s 1965 novel God Bless You, Mr Rosewater It was published in book form in 1999 The premise of the collection is that Vonnegut employs Dr Jack Kevorkian to give him near death experiences, allowing Vonnegut access to heaven and those in it for a limited time While in the afterlife Vonnegut interviews God Bless You, Dr Kevorkian, Kurt VonnegutGod Bless You, Dr Kevorkian, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a collection of short fictional interviews written by Vonnegut The title parodies that of Vonnegut s 1965 novel God Bless You, Mr Rosewater It was published in book form in 1999 The premise of the collection is that Vonnegut employs Dr Jack Kevorkian to give him near death experiences, allowing Vonnegut access to heaven and those in it for a limited time While in the afterlife Vonnegut interviews a range of people including Adolf Hitler, William Shakespeare, Isaac Asimov, and the ever present Kilgore Trout a fictional character created by Vonnegut in his earlier works 2012 1389 96 9789642432301 20 My enjoyment of this book was only slightly lessened by the fact that I didn t know who half these people were, thus I didn t get the jokes Other than that, I enjoyed it I especially liked the bits about Hitler and James Earl Ray, two monsters reduced to whiny asshats.