!!> Reading ➶ Palm Sunday ➮ Author Kurt Vonnegut – Schematicwiringdiagram.co

Kurt Vonnegut Is Either The Funniest Serious Writer Around Or The Most Serious Funny Writer Los Angeles Times Book ReviewIn This Self Portrait By An American Genius, Kurt Vonnegut Writes With Beguiling Wit And Poignant Wisdom About His Favorite Comedians, Country Music, A Dead Friend, A Dead Marriage, And Various Cockamamie Aspects Of His All Too Human Journey Through Life This Is A Work That Resonates With Vonnegut S Singular Voice The Magic Sound Of A Born Storyteller Mesmerizing Us With Truth Vonnegut Is At The Top Of His Form, And It Is Wonderful Newsday


10 thoughts on “Palm Sunday

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    I have been reading Kurt Vonnegut since high school, so going on 30 years Only now, reading Palm Sunday, an autobiographical collection of essays, notes, letters, sketches, stories and interviews, first published in 1981, could I gain acomplete understanding of one of my favorite authors I now understand how autobiographical many of his other books are, with themes gleaned from his experiences A Los Angeles Times book review said of Vonnegut He is either the funniest serious writer a I have been reading Kurt Vonnegut since high school, so going on 30 years Only now, reading Palm Sunday, an autobiographical collection of essays, notes, letters, sketches, stories and interviews, first published in 1981, could I gain acomplete understanding of one of my favorite authors I now understand how autobiographical many of his other books are, with themes gleaned from his experiences A Los Angeles Times book review said of Vonnegut He is either the funniest serious writer around or the most serious funny writer and I don t think I can do any better than that Palm Sunday is a must for a serious fan and a good book otherwise for anyone else


  2. Oriana Oriana says:

    It s a little disingenuous to imply that I ve read this, as I only hopped around a bit, but, as if there was any doubt that Vonnegut spitting on a napkin would be deserving of the full five stars, I m giving it to this book on the strength of one piece alone the self interview, which was apparently first printed in the Paris Review.Let s take a minute to examine the brilliance of a self interview Oh, wait We don t have to, because Kurt has gone ahead and examined it for us Sentences spok It s a little disingenuous to imply that I ve read this, as I only hopped around a bit, but, as if there was any doubt that Vonnegut spitting on a napkin would be deserving of the full five stars, I m giving it to this book on the strength of one piece alone the self interview, which was apparently first printed in the Paris Review.Let s take a minute to examine the brilliance of a self interview Oh, wait We don t have to, because Kurt has gone ahead and examined it for us Sentences spoken by writers, unless they have been written out first, rarely say what writers wish to say Writers are unlucky speakers, by and large, which accounts for their being in a profession which encourages them to stay at their desks for years, if necessary, pondering what to say next and how best to say it The only way to get anything out of a writer s brain is to leave him or her alone until her or she is damn well ready to write it down.Genius Want someHere s a bit from the interview itself INTERVIEWER Did your sister try to write for money, too VONNEGUT No She could have been a remarkable sculptor, too I bawled her out one time for not doingwith the talents she had She replied that having talent doesn t carry with it the obligation that something has to be done with it This was startling news to me I thought people were supposed to grab their talents and run as far and fast as they could.INTERVIEWER What do you think now VONNEGUT Well what my sister said now seems a peculiarly feminine sort of wisdom I have two daughters who are as talented as she was, and both of them are damned if they are going to lose their poise and senses of humor by snatching up their talents and desperately running as far and as fast as they can They saw me run as far and as fast as I could and it must have looked like quite a crazy performance to them And this is the worst possible metaphor, for what they actually saw was a man sitting still for decades I hope you all find that as hilarious as I did But anyway, it s just astoundingly beautiful, the whole interview Vonnegut is such a genius dialogue ist, and to watch him play around like this, asking himself questions and picking up on the subtext beneath the answers in order to ask slightlyprobing questions, or even veering off into totally unexpected territory Well really, it s just wonderful


  3. Susan Susan says:

    I loved every word of this book, and I plan to reread it It isn t really a memoir in the traditional sense of offering an autobio, but some important parts of V s bio do stand out as he talks about the world and what human beings are doing with it V is irreverent as always, hilariously so, and extremely political, as always, and supremely ethical and all of this while making me laugh I really loved the way that he talks about the craft of writing, sort of giving notes as he goes along abou I loved every word of this book, and I plan to reread it It isn t really a memoir in the traditional sense of offering an autobio, but some important parts of V s bio do stand out as he talks about the world and what human beings are doing with it V is irreverent as always, hilariously so, and extremely political, as always, and supremely ethical and all of this while making me laugh I really loved the way that he talks about the craft of writing, sort of giving notes as he goes along about what a writer is and does, and what function literature can have In that sense, his book really is a memoir, as he contextualizes narrative fragments that he has written while on his life journey his personal experience of having survived the US fire bombing of Dresden and having been assigned the task of disposing of the dead, an experience that he uses as the referent for his acclaimed novel Slaughter House Five wildly satiric graduation speeches that made me laugh my butt off thinking about the looks on the faces of the parents and families all dressed up for their son daughter s big day eulogies for lost friends, letters to newspapers, to small towns in the heartland who felt it wise to burn V s books lest they corrupt the minds of our youth, etc etc etc Another book that lifts my heart and tempts me to believe that there s something worth struggling for on this planet and that human beings just might have something important to offer in the quest to treat the world and the people in it as if all of this mattered


  4. britt_brooke britt_brooke says:

    Laughs are exactly as honorable as tears This nonfiction collection is a mishmash of speeches, essays, interviews, and family history with a healthy dose of his inherited heart felt moral code A must read for KV fans I love his nonfiction because it s very conversational If I could have dinner with an author, dead or alive, I would certainly choose him.


  5. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    The sequel to the bestselling smash Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons contains an unholy amount of Vonnegut s semi profound public speeches semi profound as a good thing , hewn together with a great deal of amiable rambling and autobiographical detail For a thorough account of Vonnegut s impressive lineage descended from prosperous Germans, no less and illuminating accounts of his early life far less torturous than the gloss he gives in some of his prefaces , this is an indispensable collectio The sequel to the bestselling smash Wampeters, Foma and Granfalloons contains an unholy amount of Vonnegut s semi profound public speeches semi profound as a good thing , hewn together with a great deal of amiable rambling and autobiographical detail For a thorough account of Vonnegut s impressive lineage descended from prosperous Germans, no less and illuminating accounts of his early life far less torturous than the gloss he gives in some of his prefaces , this is an indispensable collection A self interview, as quoted in Oriana s review, and several contentious digressions about the writer s life are of interest to eager MFA students who want to slurp up his brilliance, and for anyone less who can listen to Vonnegut lovingly for hours and months and years Me On a less interesting note, I read this book entirely on a Sunday Next up, John Barth s The Friday Book entirely on a Friday Go tedious conformism


  6. Carol Storm Carol Storm says:

    Good eulogy for Chicago tough guy James T Farrell, but why on earth was he sucking up to William F Buckley And what s with my list of really cool celebrity friends How insecure was this guy anyway


  7. Tony Tony says:

    Reading Vonnegut is such a rewarding experience It s also such an easy one, his words flow with such ease as if he is in the room and addressing you alone.I enjoyed this, but I so longed for it to be a story, for the appearance of Trout or Pilgrim or even Hoover I miss Mr Vonnegut.God Bless You.And so he went.


  8. Frederick Frederick says:

    In 1980, Vonnegut collected various speeches, reviews and letters he d written and added commentary The result was the book PALM SUNDAY I ve always thought Vonnegut was somewhat sloppy, but, reading PALM SUNDAY made it clear to me that Vonnegut s sloppiness is part of a method He was actually a writer of tremendous rigor.He even points out that his repetition of the phrase And so it goes is his version of Celine s use of ellipses.PALM SUNDAY isinteresting to me than Vonnegut s novels, In 1980, Vonnegut collected various speeches, reviews and letters he d written and added commentary The result was the book PALM SUNDAY I ve always thought Vonnegut was somewhat sloppy, but, reading PALM SUNDAY made it clear to me that Vonnegut s sloppiness is part of a method He was actually a writer of tremendous rigor.He even points out that his repetition of the phrase And so it goes is his version of Celine s use of ellipses.PALM SUNDAY isinteresting to me than Vonnegut s novels, because he gets directly to the things I like to hear him talk about Man s inhumanity to man, man s strangeness, the plight of the individual.If you ve ever tried to write fiction, PALM SUNDAY has, throughout, some very serious and practical advice If you ve ever wondered what an established writer goes through, there s a letter here addressed to a school which burns Vonnegut s books If you re interested in the World War Two generation, read Vonnegut s account of the bombing of Dresden He was an American soldier captured by the Germans He and his fellow prisoners were sent down to the basement of a slaughterhouse When they came back up, the city which was there when they went downstairs was gone So, he d survived, as a prisoner, the complete destruction, by his compatriots, of a city of the enemy His novel about this, SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE, has a science fiction element because that s the only way Kurt Vonnegut could translate the experience into art PALM SUNDAY refers intermittently to the bombing of Dresden.Vonnegut was not sloppy He kept his sanity by writing He points this fact out several times He earned the right to point it out over and over again.Also included in this book is a history of his family written by a friend of his parents Vonnegut comments on it, but it, in itself, sheds much light on Vonnegut s background, and does it with a touch of pathos.Vonnegut comments on many of the notable literary figures of the day His essay of William F Buckley, Jr., while acknowledging the total political differences between Vonnegut and Buckley, nevertheless, captures Buckley as well as any description has Buckley died a few days ago Vonnegut died about half a year ago Also here is Vonnegut s truly deep, masterful review of Joseph Heller s SOMETHING HAPPENED, which appeared in THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW It s an example of Vonnegut stepping outside of himself and communicating another writer s message Heller and Vonnegut were friends, and I gather Vonnegut wanted to summon up all his powers in the writing of that review I read that review when it was printed, in 1974, and it has stayed in my mind ever since I remember itclearly than many of the novels by Vonnegut which I ve read And I love his novels.I learned a few things from PALM SUNDAY, and I hope the fact that I learned these things might cause you to seek this book out Vonnegut s home city, Indianapolis, had its center gutted when Vonnegut was in middle age Many of the buildings torn down had been designed by members of his family.Vonnegut called Mark Twain an American Saint Vonnegut was descended from Free Thinkers His religious skepticism was, therefore, inherited When invited to preach yes one Palm Sunday at St Clement s Episcopal Church in New York, he accepted, and, in his sermon, referred to himself as a Christ worshiping agnostic He didn t like movies.He said this Some people say that my friend Gore Vidal, who once suggested in an interview that I was the worst writer in the United States, is witty I myself think he wants an awful lot of credit for wearing a three piece suit Threereasons to read this book are the self interview, the send up of Depression era musicals and the general sense given of a man talking directly to anybody reading


  9. Joshua Rigsby Joshua Rigsby says:

    You know how sometimes you get home from work too tired to cook so you throw open the fridge and pull out all the leftovers That is this book It s a smorgasbord of family history, speeches, observations, and work rejected for publication elsewhere Some of it is edible, some even enjoyable, but a few dishes should have been thrown away months ago, before they sprouted legs and eyes So it goes.


  10. Alya AlShaibani Alya AlShaibani says:

    3.5